Does the Check Engine Light Indicate a Transmission Issue?

While seeing your car’s check engine light start glowing might send you into a bit of a panic, you can take comfort in knowing that it’s probably Does the Check Engine Light Indicate a Transmission Issue?

While seeing your car’s check engine light start glowing might send you into a bit of a panic, you can take comfort in knowing that it’s probably not a problem with your transmission. It could be, but the odds are that it’s something else. Check engine lights turn on for a multitude of reasons, some more pressing than others. This article will cover a few of the most common causes for a check engine light to start flashing, as well as how to determine if it does happen to be a transmission issue.

So, if it’s not a transmission problem, what else could it be?

Your Gas Cap is Loose or Gone
Your car has a gas cap to seal off its fuel system and maintain proper levels of pressure in the fuel tank itself. A gas cap also keeps hydrocarbons from being burned off into the atmosphere when you aren’t actually driving. Luckily, if this is why your check engine light is on, it’s an easy fix; just go check your gas cap, and if it’s not on properly, screw it on tightly and you should be good!

You Need to Replace Your Mass Airflow Sensor
Your mass air flow sensor detects the air levels in your car and figures out how much fuel your car needs to run as efficiently as possible. If this is the problem, you need to replace it in order to avoid damage to other parts of your car. In addition, if you don’t replace it, your car will not operate efficiently.

Your Catalytic Converter Is Damaged
A catalytic converter is responsible for changing carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide, which reduces harm to the environment. If it’s damaged, your check engine light will turn on, and failure to replace it can cause your car to run at a higher temperature, which can later become a problem for your transmission if left unchecked.

Your Oxygen Sensor Needs Attention
Your check engine light might be on because of problems with your car’s oxygen sensor, which monitors the levels of unburned oxygen in your car’s exhaust system. Not attending to a faulty oxygen sensor can lead to damaged spark plugs or catalytic converter. This can cause your engine to start burning more fuel than it actually needs.

How Can I Tell If It Is the Transmission?
If none of the above issues are the source of your brightened check engine light, and you still think it could be the transmission, some tell-tale signs of transmission problems are jerky gear changes, the smell of smoke, transmission slippage, strange noises, fluid leaks, or off-colored transmission fluid.

Even though the odds are your transmission is fine, if you’re worried, it couldn’t hurt to check. Make sure your transmission fluid levels aren’t getting too low, and that the fluid isn’t burnt, contaminated, or ineffective. If you can’t figure out what’s wrong, bring your car to your mechanic. After all, if your check engine light is on, you’d probably have to anyway.

If you’re worried about your transmission, your engine, or any other part of your car, get in touch with Twin Transmission with your car questions and concerns in Monroe, North Carolina.
not a problem with your transmission. It could be, but the odds are that it’s something else. Check engine lights turn on for a multitude of reasons, some more pressing than others. This article will cover a few of the most common causes for a check engine light to start flashing, as well as how to determine if it does happen to be a transmission issue.

So, if it’s not a transmission problem, what else could it be?

Your Gas Cap is Loose or Gone
Your car has a gas cap to seal off its fuel system and maintain proper levels of pressure in the fuel tank itself. A gas cap also keeps hydrocarbons from being burned off into the atmosphere when you aren’t actually driving. Luckily, if this is why your check engine light is on, it’s an easy fix; just go check your gas cap, and if it’s not on properly, screw it on tightly and you should be good!

You Need to Replace Your Mass Airflow Sensor
Your mass airflow sensor detects the air levels in your car and figures out how much fuel your car needs to run as efficiently as possible. If this is the problem, you need to replace it in order to avoid damage to other parts of your car. In addition, if you don’t replace it, your car will not operate efficiently.

Your Catalytic Converter Is Damaged
A catalytic converter is responsible for changing carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide, which reduces harm to the environment. If it’s damaged, your check engine light will turn on, and failure to replace it can cause your car to run at a higher temperature, which can later become a problem for your transmission if left unchecked.

Your Oxygen Sensor Needs Attention
Your check engine light might be on because of problems with your car’s oxygen sensor, which monitors the levels of unburned oxygen in your car’s exhaust system. Not attending to a faulty oxygen sensor can lead to damaged spark plugs or catalytic converter. This can cause your engine to start burning more fuel than it actually needs.

How Can I Tell If It Is the Transmission?
If none of the above issues are the source of your brightened check engine light, and you still think it could be the transmission, some tell-tale signs of transmission problems are jerky gear changes, the smell of smoke, transmission slippage, strange noises, fluid leaks, or off-colored transmission fluid.

Even though the odds are your transmission is fine, if you’re worried, it couldn’t hurt to check. Make sure your transmission fluid levels aren’t getting too low, and that the fluid isn’t burnt, contaminated, or ineffective. If you can’t figure out what’s wrong, bring your car to your mechanic. After all, if your check engine light is on, you’d probably have to anyway.

If you’re worried about your transmission, your engine, or any other part of your car, get in touch with Twin Transmission with your car questions and concerns in Monroe, North Carolina.

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